Last edited by Yozshujin
Wednesday, May 13, 2020 | History

11 edition of The domestication of the human species found in the catalog.

The domestication of the human species

by Wilson, Peter J.

  • 369 Want to read
  • 11 Currently reading

Published by Yale University Press in New Haven .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Social evolution,
  • Architecture and society,
  • Dwellings, Prehistoric,
  • Land settlement patterns, Prehistoric,
  • Neolithic period

  • Edition Notes

    StatementPeter J. Wilson.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsGN360 .W55 1988
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxvi, 201 p. ;
    Number of Pages201
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL2530054M
    ISBN 100300042434
    LC Control Number88005516

      New clues to the origins of the horse and the spread of its domestication were presented in by a multinational team of scientists led by Vera Warmuth of the University of their bid to piece together the genetic structure of the wild horse (Equus ferus) and to determine the location of the first domesticated horse populations, the researchers sampled the DNA of more than   The history of dog domestication is that of an ancient partnership between dogs (Canis lupus familiaris) and partnership was likely originally based on a human need for help with herding and hunting, for an early alarm system, and for a source of food in addition to the companionship many of us today know and love.

    Domestication is a sustained multi-generational relationship in which one group of organisms assumes a significant degree of influence over the reproduction and care of another group to secure a more predictable supply of resources from that second group. Charles Darwin recognized the small number of traits that made domestic species different from their wild ancestors. He was also the first to recognize .   He emphasised (1) that the domestication of animals is more than taming, (2) that it represents a goal-oriented process for human purposes, (3) that the variability of physical and 'mental' characteristics is greater in domesticated species than in their wild ancestors, including the occurrence of dwarfism and gigantism, (4) that the Cited by:

    domestication is an on-going process, as humans, with increasingly sophisticated technology for breeding and rearing animals in captivity, continue to bring more and more species under their control. Understanding the process of animal domestication and its reciprocal impacts on humans and animal domesticates requires a multidisciplinary approach.   But the history of the human relationship to animals and agriculture is now being rewritten. Domestication, it appears, wasn’t a one-way street: new research suggests that species moved from wild to tame multiple times over their history, and that human agency played a far smaller role than previously believed.


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The domestication of the human species by Wilson, Peter J. Download PDF EPUB FB2

In the exciting book Peter J. Wilson takes domestication as the starting point for his continued inquiry into human evolution. Wilson argues that settling down into a built environment was the most radical and far-reaching innovation in human development and that it Cited by: In the exciting book Peter J.

Wilson takes domestication as the starting point for his continued inquiry into human evolution. Wilson argues that settling down into a built environment was the most radical and far-reaching innovation in human development and that it /5.

In the exciting book Peter J. Wilson takes domestication as the starting point for his continued inquiry into human evolution. Wilson argues that settling down into a built environment was the most radical and far-reaching innovation in human development and that it had a crucial effect on human psychology and social relations.

In the exciting book Peter J. Wilson takes domestication as the starting point for his continued inquiry into human evolution. Wilson argues that settling down into a built environment was the most. Description In the exciting book Peter J. Wilson takes domestication as the starting point for his continued inquiry into human evolution.

Wilson argues that settling down into a built environment was the most radical and far-reaching innovation in human development and that it had a crucial effect on human psychology and social relations. Summary: In the exciting book The domestication of the human species book J.

Wilson takes domestication as the starting point for his continued inquiry into human evolution. Wilson argues that settling down into a built environment was the most radical and far-reaching innovation in human development and that it had a crucial effect on human psychology and social relations.

Wilson's book "The Domestication of the Human Species" (). Wilson is an anthropologist and uses anthropological methods. Prehistorically, his main thesis is the "revolutionary significance of architecture" for human evolution. He focuses essentially on the elaborated house in the framework.

(Brandy Fogg) I recently had the pleasure of reading Ray Pierotti and Brandy Fogg's new book called The First Domestication: How Wolves and Humans Coevolved. In their landmark book, the authors. Synopsis. In this exciting new book the author of Man, the Promising Primate takes domestication as the starting point for his continued inquiry into human evolution.

Peter J. Wilson believes that the most radical and far-reaching innovation in human development was this settling down into a built environment, and he argues /5(3). The domestication process is set during a temporal succession of interactions between a species and humans: the so-called "domestication pathways" [10, 25].

An overview of published Author: Melinda Zeder. The "domestication" of humans occurred when fomerly nomadic peoples settled down to a sedentary, agricultural (Neolithic) life. Whereas nomaic hunter/gatherers have a "focus-oriented" spatial framework, domesticated people have a "boundary-oriented" framework.

Architecture and walls have a fundamental influence over behavior, ideas, and culture/5. The story of how dogs, horses, cattle, apples, rice and other species were domesticated proves an excellent perspective on deep human history. CLIVE ROOTS has been a zoo director for many years.

He has travelled the world collecting live animals for zoo conservation programs. Roots has acted as a masterplanning and design consultant for numerous zoological garden and related projects around the world, and has written many books on zoos and natural history s: 2.

The Domestication of Humans The DomesTica Tion of humans ABSTRACT: In the last few years it has become evident that the Eur opean Upper P aleolithic "replacement" model was. In her book If You Tame Me: Understanding Our Connection with Animals, social psychologist Leslie Irvine defines domestication as "the process through which the care, diet and most important, breeding of a species come under human control." The first animals to be domesticated were not animals bred for food, but other carnivores, the canids.

Domestication is the process of adapting wild plants and animals for human use. Domestic species are raised for food, work, clothing, medicine, and many other uses.

Domesticated plants and animals must be raised and cared for by humans. Hunting species: 20, years ago: During the most recent ice age, from ab years ago (see Ice Ages), large mammals such as bison roam on the sub-arctic tundra of Europe and are preyed upon by two groups of hunters, both much smaller and weaker than themselves - but both with a sufficiently developed social system to enable them to hunt and kill in packs.

Artificial selection is the selection of advantageous natural variation for human ends and is the mechanism by which most domestic species evolved. Most domesticates have their origin in one of a few historic centers of domestication as farm animals. Two notable exceptions are cats and dogs.

Wolf domestication was initiated late in the Mesolithic when humans were nomadic by:   The domestication of other species has played an undeniably central role in the evolution of modern humans, and in our planetary dominance and success.

In view of this fact, researchers have over the years investigated the genetic underpinnings and the anatomical, neural, physiological and behavioral consequences of domestication across a. Book review – The First Domestication: How Wolves and Humans Coevolved The evolution of domestic dogs from wolves is something that has been written about a great deal.

Seeing dogs are one of our oldest domesticates and very close to. ‘The domestication of dogs was one of the most extraordinary events in human history,” Hare says.

But controversies abound concerning where a long-feared animal first became our closest Author: Brian Handwerk.One crucial question, especially for a book like this one, is to what extent domestication affected dogs’ behaviour and more specifically dogs’ social behaviour. Clearly, domestication affected dogs’ morphology in ways paralleled by other domesticated species (e.g., goats).Cited by: 8.The link between wild cattle and humans has existed for thousands of years.

Five species of wild cattle have been domesticated approximately in the last years (Helmer et al. ). This domestication process has provided many benefits to humans, from meat and milk, to draught animals (see also Chapter 3 in my book for more details).